KIP - Kabul Institute for PeaceKIP - Kabul Institute for Peace
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Strategic Focus Areas

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Peace

KIP will systematically explore emerging consensus on gaps that have the potential to jeopardize durable peace in Afghanistan. KIP will develop surveys around these gaps, then survey people throughout Afghanistan at the district level and in statistically significant numbers to develop data around what Afghans want and what peace means to Afghans. This data will then be made available to policy analysts and various international actors that are involved in Afghan peace processes. Empirically untested arguments and citizens’ views will be substantiated through case study analysis so as to positively impact the decision-making process. Initial research areas will include developing surveys that will collect usable data on the following:

Role of women, including inclusion of women in peace process and role of women in governance structures post-peace settlements ;

Role of war crime victims, including inclusion of war victims in peace settlement talks;

Lack of transparency in peace negotiations, including how there is little daylight into how negotiations are proceeding and how participants are selected other than current power-elite inclusion.

Reconciliation

After four decades of protracted conflict, Afghanistan is reaching an unprecedented chance for peace. To ensure a sustainable peace is achieved, there is a need for a reconciliation program in the post conflict Afghanistan. A reconciliation that involves a through reintegration of the ex-combatants into the society, as well as a national development program. As with peace, for reconciliation KIP will explore questions around various reconciliation-related issues. KIP will develop surveys around these issues, then survey people throughout Afghanistan at the district level and in statistically substantial numbers to develop data around what Afghans want from various reconciliation possibilities. This data will then be made available to policy analysts. . The data will be key in assisting decision-makers in choosing and pursuing reconciliation models that match the wants of the Afghan people, and therefore have a higher likelihood of resulting in durable peace in Afghanistan. This will include:

Surveys of the Afghan people to determine their goals;

Analysis of the factual reality in Afghanistan, including roles and practices of various power-brokers;

Review of reconciliation models used in other conflicts, including which have been most effective in providing durable peace;

Developing recommendations to advance societal reintegration, and economic reintegration.